12 Most Intriguing Facts About New Year’s Eve From Around The World

It’s so hard to even explain how time goes by so fast. I still think summer was just yesterday but here we are stepping into another brand new year. Well, the calendar may change, but we’re all still the same, aren’t we?

And with the celebration all around the globe, there are many different ways people gather for welcoming the new year. While the festive continues, there are also some facts that we may not have heard before. And these are not myths, they actually happen in real life, so let’s explore the varieties!

 

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1. 54% of Americans tend to kiss on midnight at new year’s eve.

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2. Ethiopia has 13 months. Their current year is still 2010 and they celebrate New Years on September 11.

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3. The tiny Pacific island nation of Kiribati is the first to welcome the New Year as it is located in the world’s earliest time zone.

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4. You can actually spend a long New Year’s by traveling in plane starting from Australia to Hawaii, according to their time zones.

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5. An old superstition thought it is unlucky to sweep the floor out of the door on January 1. For good luck, you should sweep from door to hearth.

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6. The history of making a New Year’s Resolution started from the ancient Babylonians made promises to begin the year off right and to earn the approval of their gods.

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7. According to the statistics, a maximum number of cars get stolen on New Year’s Day as people leave their cars behind and stroll around the streets.

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8. On New year day back in 2010, the Muslim extremists tried to blow up the Russian celebrating in Red square Moscow but it ended up killing only the terrorists when the trigger didn’t work out.

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9. People of Peru men, women and children welcome the new year by participating in a fist fight and after that, they all drink together and greet the new year with no bad emotions or ill thoughts.

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10. People celebrating New Year’s in Timesquare NY, wear adult diapers because there aren’t enough bathrooms.

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11. In Johannesburg South Africa, people throw household objects from the terrace to the streets as a tradition on New Year.

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12. The traditional New Year song “Auld Lang Syne” is an old Scottish tune sung by a Canadian singer Lombardo in 1929, NYC that became popular and a tradition that is still followed.

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I hope that was interesting enough for you if it is not then you still got to learn something new, so yay! Anyways, Happy New Year to all of you out there!

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